Monthly Archives: December 2017

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

November started well with a late birthday present for myself from Graham arriving by courier to the house. it was a good choice – a very, very tasty bottle of gin and I have sampled it on a number of occasions now!

But of course, the highlight of November is John’s birthday. This year we went for a few days to a small village called Lendas on the south coast, not so far from Matala and about 2 or 3 hours from here. On one side of it, there is ‘the lion of Lendas’ and on the other some nice beaches.

It was not so easy to find somewhere to stay at this time of year but our friends, Brigitte and Walter, suggested the Villa Nostalgia, and it proved to be ideal.  The road down to the village was twisty and there was an inconsistent surface to it. This meant that the driver needed constant vigilance to avoid the potholes.  We were delighted that we did not have to go back up the road until our holiday was finished because for three says the sun shone from morning till night.  Being sun lovers, we found the empty beaches, sunbathed and swam,

went for a walk

and admired the odd cat on the beach.

Very peaceful.  We celebrated John’s birthday drinking prosecco and eating cake on our lovely balcony overlooking the sea.

Lendas is primarily a tourist village but not at this time of year.

We  were possibly the only tourists in the village, thus not being able to sample any of the above!  It was a particularly interesting experience eating in the village. We found one taverna that was open

and after discovering that the menu advertised was not available, we ate what was suggested which was pork chops on the first night. From then on, each night we ordered something for the next night. The food was simple but it was freshly cooked, we had the taverna mainly to ourselves and we got to watch Greek TV news and a game show as we ate. And we chatted to our personal cook, Evangelia. There was no nightlife so we admired the sunset

and focused on trying to improve our backgammon!  I have been reading that there are moves to develop winter tourism in Crete but I am not sure that Lendas will be a priority and selfishly for us that is just fine!

The local ex-pat organisation, INCO, has been pretty active recently and we have enjoyed a couple of events related to the Minoans. One was a visit to the Kefali Minoan site, near Sisi, which is not open to the public. The site is right beside the sea and you can see from its location why it emerged as a trading and administrative centre .  The archaeologist, Gavin McGuire, is an excellent communicator and an enthusiast too, about this particular site, which has proved to be a lot bigger and more important than previously thought.

It has not yet been given official ‘palace’ status but he told us that is, what it is. He told us what they found in specific rooms (such as loom weights) and that the range of activities, supported the view that there was an artisan infrastructure underpinning a large and important settlement. He also explained that people lived and worked in the same building.

We visited the cemetery and learned something about the Minoan people. For example, he told us that women generally lived only till they were in their early 20’s and had babies much earlier than us. He gave us a vivid description of what it must been like for the people, who lived here after the volcano in Santorini erupted in 1450 BC.  What a scary and miserable experience!  After the tsunami resulting from the eruption, people experienced 20 or 30 years of darkness where nothing grew and there was evidence of cannibalism. He also argued that evidence is emerging that the Minoan civilization was not quite the peace loving, matriarchal society that has been previously presented. We heared a little about the techniques the archaeologists use now, to learn and speculate more about the Minoans. It seems that there are artifacts from the site being DNA tested in many centres in the world. As you can tell, all of this was fascinating to me.

The following week, we found out a bit what the Minoans ate. The event was held at Agios Nikolaos marina,

a perfect setting to drink wine and eat tasty food at lunchtime, chat to friends and hear a talk on Minoan food in warm, sunny weather. Again, Gavin McGuire was there, helping with the cooking as well as answering a range of questions.

Jerolyn Morrison, from ‘Minoan Tastes’,  told us that the ingredients of the food that we were about to eat such as pork, goat, lentils, apricots, figs etc had all been found in Minoan sites.   The actual recipes, which used these ingredients, were though the product of more modern thinking!

The food was very delicious.

John and I have attended a couple of operas at the cinema, live from The Metropolitan Opera in New York. The first was The Magic Flute and the second was a new opera called ‘The Exterminating Angel’ by Thomas Ades. The latter is based on the film of Luis Bunuel. I enjoyed both but the latter was the more interesting and thought provoking. The singing was unbelievable and the sounds are designed to emphasize the surreal and frightening situation in which the group of people find themselves.  We also went to see the new film, ‘Nikos Kazantzakis’ at the cinema in Ierapetra which has just been released.

There were no English subtitles and we do look forward to seeing it again when it does come out with them on DVD! There was too much talking and too little action for us to make too much sense of it but it did trigger some discussion between us and John is now reading Kazantzakis’s book written near the end of his life ‘Report to Greco’, on which the film is loosely based.

Over the last few months, our neighbour, Ευτυχία, (which means happiness) has been ill and her daughter from Athens has been staying with her. She has been in hospital and I have hardly seen her. I am used to climbing up on the roof, to put out my washing and seeing her sitting outside her house. We wave to each other and sometimes I go round and enjoy her lovely smile and our limited but friendly conversation. Anyway, the good news is that her daughter is back in Athens and she is back to sitting outside again and she looks very well. Her son and daughter in law, who live near by, are back in charge of the support network that families provide here.

My friend, Margarita, invited me to spend an afternoon at her house and a visit to the greenhouses in Stomio, where she and her husband, Nikos, grow tomatoes as a business. Whilst in the past, she had described to me some of the financial difficulties of running such a business, it was not till I saw the lines and lines of perfect plants,

that I appreciated the scale of the enterprise, the work involved and the decisions you have to make to produce and to sell such wonderful tomatoes. I was given a box of them to take home and John and I have been  savouring their taste and texture. Margarita also gave me a late birthday present, which was a complete surprise.

It is a picture of poppies and the colours are sensational. We used to go walk together and I told her that I just loved poppies because of their vibrant colour and delicate petals. She remembered this, painted the picture and it is now on our dining room wall. Because she is so busy with producing tomatoes she doesn’t have time for walking any more but does have a little time for painting!

it is very quiet in Kavousi and it is a time for sitting in front of the fire in the evening. The weather has been warm during the day but the evenings are cool. John has organised plenty of wood

so we are very snug.  It has been tempting to stay inside and settle down to a series or two on DVD and even old comedy favourites such as ‘the Good Life’ and even one that I never saw in the 1970’s, ‘Are you being served?’. But on Tuesday we did go to Bobo’s taverna and enjoyed a lovely evening of friendly chat and nice food and came away with a bottle of new olive oil. We also made our way to Makrigialos, where our friends Shona and Rich live. First, we sat out on the balcony of their house in the sunshine and drank fizzy wine, then we ate a wonderful meal of moussaka and tiramisu. Rich is a great games fan and picks up games from many sources and in this case, it was Marks and Spencers! One person had a card with the name of a person, place or object and read out a clue. If you guessed the name, you got 10 points, if you didn’t, you were given another clue and so it goes on. I didn’t so so well but Rich loves prizes and so we all got a prize. And then the finale was the switching on of outdoor Christmas lights round the balcony. It was all just perfect!!!

For those of you who have stayed in our guest accommodation, you will, I think, approve of our latest building works here. The bathroom was certainly in need of some improvements, particularly the lighting. Normally there would be no such building work done at this time of year because the main activity is picking olives. But this year, the olives locally were damaged earlier in the year by the weather or a bug and so Alkis was very happy to tile, paint and install the new bathroom. It started like this

And now it looks like this.

Whilst he was here, John asked him to paint the ceiling of our living room and dining room, in order to make them lighter.

And what a difference, this has made.

Because of the bathroom work, the very nice weather and my preference to be out walking looking at the lovely countryside locally,

we have no decorations or cards in view yet. Hopefully this will be done this weekend. On Thursday we fly to Newquay (Aegean airways and Flybe) for Christmas with Rosie and Graham and I am so looking forward to seeing them and enjoying a bit of fun. And then on to London to welcome in 2018 with our friends, Jane, Sarah and Mark. Might be a bit cold but definitely worth it.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to everybody who reads this and we will be back in 2018.

Sheila