Monthly Archives: July 2020

Empty beaches – hospitality unchanged

It’s now the middle of July and over the past few months, it has been a great pleasure to watch the grapes grow around our patio.  My father, who grew grapes in a green house in Central Scotland would have enjoyed seeing these as well as the bouganvillea which has finally burst into flower.

When I looked at my calendar 6 weeks ago  for June and July, the majority of engagements had been crossed out.  Usually John and I  have people to stay in Kavousi, particularly in June. Last year,  we went island hopping with our friend Phil last year to Ikaria and Fourni.  But since March this year, all plans to travel have been cancelled. On June 3rd, I should have been in Edinburgh for a school reunion marking 50 years since I left.  After 10 days there, I was traveling by train to Newcastle, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, then onto Bridgend, Wales  to visit friends and fly back from Bristol.  Yesterday, Easyjet returned the fare of my cancelled flight, which was a pleasant surprise.  John was going to Somerset to meet a friend and explore churches and villages there.  When we booked all of his, we believed you could plan travel!

So what to do in June?  Lockdown had been gradually eased here in May and by the beginning of June, we were free to travel in Crete. We both love our little house in Kavousi but the thought of having a short change of scene was appealing. We also knew that in July, flights with tourists would be arriving and it seemed this was an opportunity to explore a bit and feel completely safe.   On June 17th, we set out for Tsoutsouros for three nights on the south coast. It was picked purely on the basis that we had never been there before!  We looked on booking.com for accommodation but in the end the room in the Michalis Studios was booked directly by telephone. From our room we could see the sea and  the small harbour of Tsoutouros.

We were welcomed warmly by Maria,

and we were delighted that she spoke slow and clear Greek with us. There was no-one else staying there and we enjoyed her company and her cooking. We liked particularly the selection of vegetables, grown by her husband, Michalis.  One morning, she had a surprise for us – a fresh duck egg!

Maria was sorry that the choice of food was limited because of the lack of people but we were very happy with fresh food, cooked personally for us and the friendly hospitality!

Maria had some wonderful loungers, placed underneath tamarisk  trees on the beach opposite.  There, having finished a very good biography of Leonard Cohen, I read Henry Miller’s book ‘The Colossus of Maroussi. I knew nothing of his life or his writing but this book is about Greece in 1939 and I was swept along in the book by his passion for Greece and his views on the current state of the world.

I enjoyed a lovely walk to a small village called Maridaki, which involved ambling along a coastal path, admiring the colour of the sea,

having  a brief conversation with a goat,

with a clear destination,

and even having the possibility of buying a small house!!!

The only down side was that there was no possibility of a cool beer! There was nothing open . On the way back, I got a good view of Tsoutsouras, which shows the sun beds but actually there were very few people to use them.

Later in the day we drove to nearby Kastri,  where we had a beer with our friends, Eva and Jurgen, who live nearby. We were in the same group learning Greek for many years.

As in many conversations at present, Covid19 was high on the agenda for discussion!

On the way home, we hoped to visit ancient Priansos, which is highlighted in my walking book. It has a wonderful location with the promise of a wonderful view as well as ruins and ancient churches. We had assumed there would be a dirt track that we could take the car but this was not possible so another time, I will follow the walking instructions from the Rother Walking Guide. But in our search for a road,  we did get some great views, this one of the amazing Messara Plain.

We came home for a few days but decided the following week to have another three day adventure.  This time we booked three nights at Maridatis Apartments, 3km from Palekastro at the east of the island.  It was recommended by our good friends, Walter and Brigitte.  On the way there, we went to Choni beach which was lovely.  Afterwards, we went to a taverna on Kouremenos beach, famous for surfing.  The man who served us looked and sounded very unhappy, saying there was no-one coming to the taverna during the week.

Our lunch of a Greek salad and a beer was not going to make him much happier!  The economic cost of Covid 19 was plain to see.  We arrived at Maridatis apartments and we were welcomed by Eleni. Our room was enormous and we looked out over olive trees.

The beach was only a couple of minutes away. We were the only customers again!  Manolis was a great host at dinner with lots of chat and he cooked some wonderful meals!

including  lamb chops,

and more

We looked across the olive trees from the taverna, and could see a rock where we were surprised to see a face, which someone had made some effort to paint!

On summer weekends, in previous years, there is music here on are regular basis. Eleni sings and plays the guitar with friends. We bought her latest CD.  She is also a psychotherapist and novelist and showed us her latest book. As you can imagine, it was a delight to meet her and Manolis

One day I walked to Kouremenos beach, which was quicker by foot than by car.

Another day, we went to Itanos, probably our favourite beach in Crete and very close to Maridatis. There was lots of beautiful thyme,

the sea was calm,

and there were lots of stones to admire.

John and I went back home, having experienced Greek hospitality at its best, even in bad circumstances.

International flights started arriving on July 1st. From our conversations with local people and from our trips away,  we have heard a lot of ambivalence and nervousness about the arrival of tourists on the island, even amongst people who would benefit from their income.  People on the island have felt safe because they have obeyed the rules and have kept people out over the last few months. Now, the arrival of tourists means increased health risks!

Since we came back, we have enjoyed the summer. Most mornings at 8 o’clock, John and I have swum in very calm waters at Tholos beach. We have not always been alone. Others have also enjoyed the view.

Some work has been done outside,

and john made a hard decision to throw out an old banana plant which I bought as a present for him in Ierapetra market 8 years ago for 3 euros! One year there were bananas but they didn’t ripen.  We have high hopes for the baby banana plant put in its place which is growing rapidly.

John has been cycling regularly whilst I have a series of different length walks, that I do, depending on my energy level!!!  This time, i walked to the old olive tree. The whole area had been tidied up recently by Kavousi folk and looked very smart.

On the way back, I couldn’t resist taking a picture of this!

We have now a water storage tank to deal with fluctuating water pressure, which Alkis installed on our roof

and a new small freezer in our shed delivered by Kotsovolos, the local equivalent of Dixons.

This was made possible because we sent three boxes of our daughter’s possessions back to her in Cornwall.  They had languished in our shed all the time we have lived here!. They included her football medals which, her Dad reluctantly decided should be in her possession at last. They were on the piano, but here are displayed outside before they go into a box!

We eat with friends occasionally, in this picture, we are at the taverna, Alatsi, sitting on the beach with Hans and Hanneke, eating grilled kalamari. Delicious!

We read and listen daily to a selection of simple Greek books. Recently, John was saved from having to cook a meal by our neighbour, Maria, arriving with two big portions of patsitsio and we had a good laugh over two new naughty Greek words that she taught us!!!   I have had many wonderful conversations with friends and family over the last two months. And when we are not doing anything,  then John and I sit and look at our lovely view,

and be glad of what we have.

Sheila