Monthly Archives: November 2020

Birthday burbles and more …..

Next week is my 75th birthday. I mention this not because I want the readership to rush out and buy me a present or send me a card (although either would be nice!) but stems from the fact that we are now back in lockdown here in Greece.  As a result, I am not going to be able to have the usual celebrations, given that the tavernas are closed and we are not allowed to meet friends or entertain in our houses. 

So, after the initial disappointment, I got to thinking that perhaps this was not such a bad thing and that I would not just postpone the celebrations until some time next year when hopefully things will be back to normal but rather just remain 74 for the rest of my days!

I tried out the idea on my cardiologist when I saw him last week as he had just declared me ‘perfect’ for my age. Coming after a visit to the dentist when I had to have nothing done (unlike someone else I could mention) and the ENT man who, while not quite so fulsome, did at least say that I might make it through the rest of my life without needing a hearing aid, this seemed to me to represent good news. And my cardiologist after some consideration, declared that it was a good plan and I might even consider going backwards each year. I don’t think I will go quite that far because 74 seems like a good age health-wise and it has been a good year too, despite the blessed virus. So, I think I will keep it!

Whilst on the subject of birthdays, Sheila had a particularly good one this year. We decided to have a few days in Agia Galini which is a small town on the south coast, even though the weather did not look too promising. In the event we had three great days on the beach and any plans we had to visit sites of interest were quietly shelved while we indulged in (very) late summer activities.

Present time!

We had chosen a taverna with rooms right on the beach, where the food turned out to be excellent and really there was little need to go anywhere else.

However, we did manage to struggle to a cocktail bar one evening and then on to the best restaurant in town for the birthday meal

and Sheila also fitted in a little retail therapy in Heraklion en route.

Perhaps the unexpected highlight among many, was a visit one evening to a bar for live music. It was late season so there were not many people there but at another table were a party of women of less than a certain age who were out to enjoy their evening. Before long they had persuaded the singer to join them and then proceeded to have an impromptu karaoke session followed by Greek dancing. On reflection, perhaps it was not so impromptu after all but then the waiter started dispensing raki to one and all – us included – direct from the bottle with heads tipped back. The singer was certainly well-oiled as were the ladies! We eventually staggered home somewhat bewildered!

Since we returned to Kavousi, life has followed a fairly quiet pattern. A number of ‘summer’ friends who did manage to get out here this year have now returned for the winter, including Stan & Jann and Victoria & Paul. Our little world is more limited without them but until lockdown re-started we were seeing Pauline & Chris, Hans and Hanneke and Rich and Shona on a regular basis usually for a meal in a taverna somewhere but sometimes at home.

Pauline also organised a visit to Azorias, one of our local archaeological sites, with Melissa, a local archaeologist to explain what was what. We had been on a similar visit a couple of years ago so it was interesting to find out how the archaeologists’ findings had been updated in the meantime.

We feel a special affinity for Azorias because we can it from our terrace and Sheila often walks past it on one of her favourite circular trips.

Swimming for us ended in late October when the weather became wet and windy and the temperature dropped by six or seven degrees. We now get an occasional decent day but so far nothing warm enough to tempt us back in.

That said, our exercise regime continues. As mentioned Sheila walks on a regular basis and sometimes accompanies me on her bike when I head off into the olives. However, the recent rain has made some of my favourite routes rather tricky, so my outings are more limited than I would like. Before lockdown curbed our activities somewhat, we sometimes took the car and then walked for a while. This is a favourite spot.

We may shortly have some new neighbours. Anca and Mark from Uttoxeter are hoping to buy a house just down from us. It has been on the market for sometime. Indeed we looked at it ourselves when we moved to Kavousi. It needs a little work doing so I have put them in touch with Alkis and yesterday there was a site visit. As a result Alkis will start work soon to make the place a bit more water and damp proof and if everything works out, they will take possession in the New Year. It will be good to have some new English neighbours.

Whilst on the subject of Alkis and building work, I have a new project.

We are hoping to buy a small piece of land below our house and have a flight of steps built down to the road below.This is partly to give us a second access but also if practical, to have an electric stair lift installed against the day when I am unable to climb the hill from where we park the car. (Sheila has just pointed out that as I shall be a healthy 74 year old for ever, this should not be a consideration!)

Also, I hope that it will be possible to have the staircase built in such a way as to provide additional support to the ‘Great Wall of China’ which basically prevents our house collapsing into the ravine below! Matters are at an early stage but there is nothing I like more than a good project!

It is of course that time of the year when pumpkins are in plentiful supply and readers with long memories may recall that Maria’s husband, Nikos, is known to us as the pumpkin man.This year he brought us a monster.

It took two of us to move it and it had to live in the sitting room for a week or two because there was no room in the kitchen! Eventually, I summoned up the energy to deal with it and it took nearly another week to cut it up and break it down into manageable portions for soup and chunks for the new freezer.

Well worth the effort though because the soup was amazing!

Sheila’s friend Margarita and her husband run a greenhouse business and kindly gave us a box of tomatoes and cucumbers.

I have never seen so many cucumbers and we have had to be quite inventive to find ways in which to eat them. Cucumber soup was an interesting experience!

One of the things I like the best about living in Crete is the way in which the changing seasons are reflected in the activities of local people in the village, particularly as regards their fields. November is the time for picking olives here and currently the factory at Kavousi is running at full capacity.

And next, we can look forward to a stunning crop of our own oranges!

I could mention elections but I think all has been said that needs to be said about the US election and were I to get into that, I would also need to comment on the equally nonsensical internal Labour Party elections, where the number of those taking part has dropped by over half in the last two years, as a direct result of the change of leadership, move to the right and suspension of the previous leader. We have been here before. Democracy is in the doldrums!

Finally, my family history project is moving slowly forwards and I will shortly be issuing to family and interested friends, the results of my research over forty years as it relates to the family of my paternal grandfather, Sidney Burt. This section alone runs to 90 pages and counting and there are still three more grandparents’ trees to write-up. It will be quite a tome when finished, although of course, I shall still be only 74, assuming that I am spared!

John